WW2 Australian Army Identity Disc Returned to Soldier’s Family (Metal Detecting Find).

During a hunt at the site of No.16 Australian Personnel Services Camp in early January 2012, we made the ‘dream’ find for the military relic hunter – a soldier’s Identity Disc. After many weeks of enquiries and e-mails, we have located the relatives of the soldier, and the disc has recently been returned to them. Many thanks to the staff at the Australian War Memorial, the RSL sub-branches in Western Australia and New South Wales, and the 2/16th Battalion Association in Perth for the assistance with locating the soldier’s records and subsequently, his family. Happy Hunting everyone! If you have time, please visit our blog www.nqexplorers.com

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72 thoughts on “WW2 Australian Army Identity Disc Returned to Soldier’s Family (Metal Detecting Find).

  1. Thanks for watching and commenting – we have a number of detectors, Colleen uses a Garrett ATPro for coin and relic and gold hunts, I have a GTI-2500, and we also have a Scorpion Gold Stinger and Infinium LS Pulse Induction detector for gold prospecting. We also have a Garrett Ace 250 and a 150 as back-up machines. Great to see you on YouTube, hope you post some more hunts soon – best of luck and Happy Hunting!

  2. [..YouTube..] Thanks for watching and commenting – we have a number of detectors, Colleen uses a Garrett ATPro for coin and relic and gold hunts, I have a GTI-2500, and we also have a Scorpion Gold Stinger and Infinium LS Pulse Induction detector for gold prospecting. We also have a Garrett Ace 250 and a 150 as back-up machines. Great to see you on YouTube, hope you post some more hunts soon – best of luck and Happy Hunting!

  3. That’s great news, Warren, it couldn’t have ended better than that. It also puts metal detecting in a much better light, something to be justly proud of. Happy hunting and very good luck on your next search. Rich 😀

  4. [..YouTube..] That’s great news, Warren, it couldn’t have ended better than that. It also puts metal detecting in a much better light, something to be justly proud of. Happy hunting and very good luck on your next search. Rich 😀

  5. The blade says 1907 W.S.C Theres another stamp says either
    L sideways crown 2 –or 12 or K2 then just over there`s a 42 it`s just over 12 ” long 16 notches 13 one side 3 more on the other .

  6. [..YouTube..] The blade says 1907 W.S.C Theres another stamp says either
    L sideways crown 2 –or 12 or K2 then just over there`s a 42 it`s just over 12 ” long 16 notches 13 one side 3 more on the other .

  7. [..YouTube..] @NQExplorers The blade says 1907 W.S.C Theres another stamp says either
    L sideways crown 2 –or 12 or K2 then just over there`s a 42 it`s just over 12 ” long 16 notches 13 one side 3 more on the other .

  8. Thanks for your great comments Panzer, yet I should thank you for you great work at Fromelles, we followed that story with great interest and what a great outcome! My Great Uncle was a Gallipoli veteran (landed with the first wave on 25th April), went on to France, received a severe schrapnel wound in the lung at Bulliecourt in 1918, but came home to Australia and survived to 1965! So have a real interest in WW1 Diggers -well done on locating those blokes! GL and HH mate.

  9. [..YouTube..] Thanks for your great comments Panzer, yet I should thank you for you great work at Fromelles, we followed that story with great interest and what a great outcome! My Great Uncle was a Gallipoli veteran (landed with the first wave on 25th April), went on to France, received a severe schrapnel wound in the lung at Bulliecourt in 1918, but came home to Australia and survived to 1965! So have a real interest in WW1 Diggers -well done on locating those blokes! GL and HH mate.

  10. [..YouTube..] @panzer2669
    Thanks for your great comments Panzer, yet I should thank you for you great work at Fromelles, we followed that story with great interest and what a great outcome! My Great Uncle was a Gallipoli veteran (landed with the first wave on 25th April), went on to France, received a severe schrapnel wound in the lung at Bulliecourt in 1918, but came home to Australia and survived to 1965! So have a real interest in WW1 Diggers -well done on locating those blokes! GL and HH mate.

  11. Thanks for your kind comments Mars, the solider is unfortunately no longer alive, and we were not able to ascertain when he passed away – but he came home from the war (at the ripe old age of 20!). Once again, thanks for commenting, best wishes and Happy Hunting!

  12. [..YouTube..] Thanks for your kind comments Mars, the solider is unfortunately no longer alive, and we were not able to ascertain when he passed away – but he came home from the war (at the ripe old age of 20!). Once again, thanks for commenting, best wishes and Happy Hunting!

  13. [..YouTube..] @PlugMartian
    Thanks for your kind comments Mars, the solider is unfortunately no longer alive, and we were not able to ascertain when he passed away – but he came home from the war (at the ripe old age of 20!). Once again, thanks for commenting, best wishes and Happy Hunting!

  14. Wow – that 1917 bayonet with the notches is a unique bit of history! We didn’t get to meet the family of the soldier as they live over 2,500km away – we corresponded by e-mail and letter. Thanks for your comments, much appreciated – best wishes and Happy Hunting!

  15. [..YouTube..] Wow – that 1917 bayonet with the notches is a unique bit of history! We didn’t get to meet the family of the soldier as they live over 2,500km away – we corresponded by e-mail and letter. Thanks for your comments, much appreciated – best wishes and Happy Hunting!

  16. [..YouTube..] @MrMrtiki
    Wow – that 1917 bayonet with the notches is a unique bit of history! We didn’t get to meet the family of the soldier as they live over 2,500km away – we corresponded by e-mail and letter. Thanks for your comments, much appreciated – best wishes and Happy Hunting!

  17. Thanks Mr T, appreciate your comments mate – the family was of course surprised – and excited to get the disc after 70 years! HH mate.